Joan Miro

Joan Miro

Artwork

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Joan Miro
Born in Barcelona, Spain in 1893, Joan Miro exhibited his artistic talents at a very young age. He studied at the Academy of Barcelona and later at the Academy of Francisco Gali, where he was influenced by the Fauves, Impressionists and Cubists. Miro departed for Paris in 1919 where he became friendly with Picasso. Miro was part of the group that signed the first Surrealist Manifesto in 1924 and although his style was Surrealistic, it bordered on the fantastic. Miro's senses of the marvelous and humor are ever-present in his work. His ballet costume and set designs, his collages and large pastels reflect his capacity for re-invention and change. Miro engraved some fifty prints, mostly etchings and aquatints, with some dry-point etchings. As in his painting at the time, he was most influenced by Pollock and abstract expressionism. In 1967 Miro was introduced to a new technique: silicon carbide engraving. Miro thought the results from this new process fascinating and very beautiful. He felt he could create with more richness and freedom...which give a beautiful substance and a more powerful line. The engravings created between 1928 and 1983 reveal Miro conquering this most unforgiving of mediums where there are no second chances. He illustrated more than 1100 frontispieces and illustrations that adorn collections of verse. These illustrations and hundreds more testify to Miro's deep understanding of the combined power of poetry and art and to his phenomenal talent as an engraver. Born in Barcelona, Spain in 1893, Joan Miro exhibited his artistic talents at a very young age. He studied at the Academy of Barcelona and later at the Academy of Francisco Gali, where he was influenced by the Fauves, Impressionists and Cubists. Miro departed for Paris in 1919 where he became friendly with Picasso. Miro was part of the group that signed the first Surrealist Manifesto in 1924 and although his style was Surrealistic, it bordered on the fantastic. Miro's senses of the marvelous and humor are ever-present in his work. His ballet costume and set designs, his collages and large pastels reflect his capacity for re-invention and change. Miro engraved some fifty prints, mostly etchings and aquatints, with some dry-point etchings. As in his painting at the time, he was most influenced by Pollock and abstract expressionism. In 1967 Miro was introduced to a new technique: silicon carbide engraving. Miro thought the results from this new process fascinating and very beautiful. He felt he could create with more richness and freedom...which give a beautiful substance and a more powerful line. The engravings created between 1928 and 1983 reveal Miro conquering this most unforgiving of mediums where there are no second chances. He illustrated more than 1100 frontispieces and illustrations that adorn collections of verse. These illustrations and hundreds more testify to Miro's deep understanding of the combined power of poetry and art and to his phenomenal talent as an engraver. For more information, please contact New River Fine Art 914 East Las Olas Boulevard Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 954-524-2100 www.newriverfineart.com
Artist